Pa’i ki’i Imagery

August 21, 2014

Wide or Less Wide

Here’s a recent image of a vista I see regularly.  It’s the landing zone for the hang gliding pilots. I get to see it under many different conditions from early morning to late afternoon. I tend to prefer wide shots.  I find they express my impression of a location better.  Here, I wanted to capture the expanse of clouds moving over the land and the rain at Waimanalo Beach.

Waimanalo Beach Rain

That doesn’t mean I don’t work the area looking for other possibilities.

 

Waimanalo Beach Rain close up

October 7, 2013

Summer Squall

Summer Squall

Talk about take it and forget it.   I grabbed a series of shots for a panorama of this rain squall over Kaneohe on a July day in 2011.

February 4, 2013

Sometimes You Stick the Landing

And Sometimes the Landing Sticks you.

That’s what’s about to happen to my friend as he brings his glider in for a landing. The upper right corner of the photo shows the ridge line which starts at this end of Oahu and runs up the spine of the island called the Koolau Mountains. Just around the corner is the spot on the ridge from which the pilots launch. It’s a great view at 1100 ft above Waimanalo Bay.  Naturally, visitors find the thought of flying off the ridge intimidating.  The launch is the easiest part.  The pilot can choose the best moment to fly off the ridge.  Landing is a different situation.  Once you commit to land, you’ve got to adjust to the conditions as you find them. In this case, the glider had a little more forward momentum than my friend wanted. The glider is in a nose up stall position but it pulled him off his feet.    Unfortunately, the stall is about to bring them both to an abrupt stop. Fortunately, neither was damaged.

SONY DSC

June 23, 2012

Practice

An essential aspect of paragliding is handling your wing during your launch. A good pilot never misses the opportunity to spend a few minutes ground handling the wing.

 

Practice

November 29, 2011

Up High

If you look closely you’ll see a little dot in the upper right of the picture near the top edge.  The hang glider is over 2000 feet high.

 

SONY DSC

July 7, 2011

A Challenge

Outdoor photography can be challenging more so when subjects aren’t static.  You’ll find plenty of advice for landscape photography.  It assumes you’re deciding where and when you point your lens at a subject.  You also have the luxury of manually setting your aperture and shutter.  Even some outdoor activities operate in a “controlled” environment.  Activities like baseball and soccer take place within a defined area where the light doesn’t change to a significant degree over the course of a game. Then there are activities like hang gliding and paragliding where the conditions can change as the wings move across a sky that is rarely static.  Ideally a blue sky with some puffy white clouds is the best condition.  That’s when the automatic focus works to perfection and noise is nonexistent. The less than ideal is when you really have to work at it.  This image is an example of that.  The paraglider has landed with me looking into the sun. That is a problem under these conditions because the ridge is in deep shadow Since I’m  on shutter priority my aperture sets itself in kind. But the aperture on my zoom lens opens only so wide.  Fortunately, the sun over the wing gives a nice sunburst effect along with the lens flare which leads the eye down to the paraglider pilot.  I could have cropped out hang glider wing at the bottom but I like the added dimension and context it gives the scene.  The image out of the camera had a much darker foreground because my aperture could only open so much.  However with the help of Lightroom and the Graduated Filter Tool I could lighten the foreground as you see it without noise becoming an issue.    Allan Landing

May 23, 2011

Molokai Channel Rainbow

 

Molokai Channel Rainbow

April 1, 2011

Fishing at Cockroach Bay

 

Fishing at Cockroach Bay

February 28, 2011

Wide View

No Parking-1

No Parking-1

February 21, 2011

Whale watching spot

Hawaii is over half way thru Whale Watching season.  A prime spot to see whales on Oahu is Makapuu Point.  Here’s a panorama I took standing on the lookout directly above Makapuu Lighthouse and facing mauka. To the right is the Windward side of Oahu.

 

Makapuu Point

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