Pa’i ki’i Imagery

June 15, 2015

Up and Over

It’s been awhile since I created a sequence image.  I saw the possibility as he was going into the maneuver. It would’ve been a more complete image, if I’d seen it a little sooner.

 

Up and Over

August 24, 2014

Surfer in Sequence

I’ve done a bunch of sequence shots with my hang gilding and paragliding friends.  Today I saw the same possibility while getting some surf shots.  There’s a spot called China Walls.  A shelf along the shoreline of Koko Head where a south swell will run almost perpendicular to the ledge. A surfer gets a nice ride if the wave breaks at the correct angle to the ledge. I got this handheld and at noon.  I’m generally pleased but it does lack a sense of depth. I don’t get a sense of the swell as it moved thru the frame propelling the surfer along. Maybe earlier in the day or late afternoon would improve the composition.

Surfer Shaun in sequence

March 2, 2013

RAW or JPG

A continuous source of discussion is to ask do you shoot RAW or JPG. Either is a valid option. One can be a better choice in a given situation than the other.   Here’s a situation for which I’m glad I shot RAW.  This is  a panorama I created from a series of photos I took five years ago.  At the time I wasn’t thinking of making a panorama. DUH!  The cloud formation attracted my attention. In addition the water was calm and reflective. Fortunately, I had my 17-35mm lens on and had worked the scene for several images at the widest angle. By doing so, I inadvertently provided myself with enough images for a panorama five years later. (Which is a good tip to keep in mind in the future!) In addition, I shot in RAW, so I could manipulate the images without worrying about loss of image quality. Remember, RAW contains all the original data recorded by the sensor while JPG throws out data at the time of creation because it compresses the data.  What you see here is a high quality JPG image from the Photoshop file created by blending the original RAW shots together to make the panorama.  Would this image be perceptively worse if the original images had been JPG’s? Viewing on a computer monitor perhaps not. However, if you wanted to print (Yes, he did use the P word) this and put it on a wall, the higher the quality the better the color gamut and the larger a print you can make.

  What's God spelling

September 7, 2012

Tweaked Clouds

Took a walk around the neighborhood this afternoon. Too much sedentary exercise! I needed to move the rest of my body. It had been a mostly cloudy and muggy day.  Knowing at some point I’d see something I could make an image of I brought my camera. The sky contained mostly indistinct clouds but for a short period these clouds formed just above a nearby ridge. Quickly I composed several shots for a panorama.  I saw this as a Black and White to bring out the different structures in the clouds. After stitching them together in Photoshop, I ran thru some presets in Lightroom and used on called Dynamic Silver III created by Gavin Seim. A little more tweaking and here you are.

Tweaked Clouds

August 13, 2012

Which do you prefer?

Lightroom makes it very easy to give an image a dizzying number of treatments in color, black and white, sepia, two tone and cross process styles. Even better they can all be virtual. Existing only within Lightroom until you decide to export an image to the preferred file format. Occasionally I’ll play with an image in Lightroom to see if I can find a more eye catching version.

I created a sequence shot of a friend of mine taking off in his hang glider.  I’ve made these before but not recently since I’m usually helping them launch.

Brant floats away colorBrant floats away black and white

I had a hard time finding a satisfactory B&W because of the ground clutter in the background.  The different styles didn’t separate his body enough from the background.  I have a sense of depth in the color version that I couldn’t find in B&W. I’m conscience of a person seeing the image for the first time and being confused about what’s going on.  Especially since it’s a sequence photo.

So which do your prefer? Color or Black and White. Thumbs up  Thumbs down

July 30, 2012

Blue Molokai

Here’s a panorama of 9 images stitched together in Photoshop.  I kicked up the vibrance in Lightroom.  The blue helps to bring out the island of Molokai in the center, the west end of Maui to the left and Lanai to the far right. The little dot is a cargo carrier headed for the port at Kahului.

 

Blue Molokai

July 17, 2012

Panorama of sorts

I haven’t gotten any sequence pictures recently.  These tend to be unplanned photo ops and none have come up recently.  This also became a panorama in its creation. Two for the price of one!

 

 

Speedwing and Goto

December 29, 2011

Playing the sun down

Playing the sun down

May 7, 2011

Lightroom Fun or How to do More with Less

Just outside the Assagio’s at the Ala Moana Shopping in Honolulu is a 12 foot tall water sculpture. I took pics of it a few months back but didn’t think too highly of what I got.  The picture bottom left was the best of the lot.  Images like this are candidates for Lightroom presets.  Presets range from a simple Black and White to a very funky looking infrared treatment.  I’ve posted numerous images on the blog utilizing presets.  Creating a preset is just a matter of changing the different settings in the Develop Module and then saving a group of settings you like.  Then click on that preset and your image will instantly change to reflect those settings.  If you like it, print it or export it to your photo sharing site, and whatever changes you make have no effect on the original image.

Here I am with an “EH” photo looking for inspiration in a preset and I stop at the Point Curve Presets.  These are presets which manipulate the Tone Curve.

Tone Curve

This one makes the curve look like an “M” as you can see here.  Presets are not set in stone.  You can play with it if the initial look isn’t what you wanted.  Which is what I did here. Moving the Dark slider back and forth,  I liked the different results but didn’t think the individual images were as interesting as the kaleidoscopic result I created from moving the slider back and forth!  How to recreate that effect?  An animated GIF file!!! The first step is to create a series of virtual images with incremental changes to the image. In this case, I moved the dark slider over ten points at a time starting from –100 ending at +100 resulting in 22 different virtual images. To create the GIF, I had Lightroom export the images into separate layers in Photoshop with the “Edit in” command.

In Photoshop I select all the layers then open the animation palette by choosing “Window” from the menu bar and selecting “Animation“.  With the animation palette open, ( it’s a long strip at the bottom of the window)  I needed to convert each layer to it’s own frame in the animation palette. With all the layers selected, I clicked the flyout menu in the upper right hand corner of the animation palette and choose “Make frames from layers”. The animation palette will be populated by frames of each image. Then I needed to choose how long each image will display in the GIF with the frame delay option.  For this, I picked .05 sec.  Finally, I saved it with “ Save for Web and Devices (.gif under this option)” in the File menu.

There is one caveat to this. Make sure you reduce the images to a manageable size!!!  Assuming you’re working with images from a DSLR as I was, you can’t work with the original size in Photoshop.  Especially since I had 22 versions of the image.  Photoshop will choke and die when you save for the web. I could have used a smaller number of images but I liked the effect with 22.  I exported the different versions as JPEG’s  resizing on the long edge at 1024 and a quality setting of 25.  Then I Imported those images back into Lightroom and used them to create the GIF in Photoshop.

From a plain Jane to a Kaleidoscope of Color!  (click on the image to see it change)

Shifting Colors                                                                    

March 6, 2011

Having Fun

A friend of mine took a picture of herself recently and I saw some possibilities for having fun with lightroom presets. This emulates a Kodak film Porta VC 160 along with edits to the tone curve to create a negative image.   You can create your own presets or download ones for free or purchase them from other enterprising photographers such as Gavin Seim .  You can quickly go thru dozens of presets looking for just the right one.  I chose this one because it shows her eyes and eyebrows nicely.  Catwoman eyes! Enjoy!

 

Tony Neg Kodak1

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